D Btry 2Bn 1st ADA 32nd AADCOM Unit History

D 2 1 ADA 32nd  AADCOM  Admin Area

The 2nd Battalion, 1st Air Defense Artillery, was activated on 13 September 1972 in Germany. It was inactivated on 30 June 1983 in Germany. The unit was reactivated on 16 June 1987 at Fort Bliss, Texas and inactivated on 15 September 1994 at Fort Bliss, Texas. The unit was reactivated on 4 May 1996 at Fort Lewis, Washington.


D 2 1 ADA 32nd AADCOM

D 2 1 ADA 32nd  AADCOM Launcher Area C section Launcher Crew

                                  32nd Army Air & Missile Defense Command

In February 1951, the unit was reactivated at Mildenhall, England as the 32d Anti-Aircraft Brigade to defend U.S. Air Force bases from air attack. In June 1957, the brigade deployed from England to Kaiserslautern, Federal Republic of Germany. The following year it was re-designated Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 32d Artillery Brigade. The unit was initially equipped with 75mm and 90mm anti-aircraft guns but acquired the Nike Hercules Missile System in 1960 and the Hawk Missile System in 1961. In May 1961, the 32d was re-designated as the 32d Army Air Defense Command. Subordinate to the 32d AADCOM were the 10th, 69th, 94th and 108th ADA brigades, making it the largest air defense unit in the U.S. Army. As part of USAREUR and Seventh U.S. Army, it maintained a constant watch over West Germany in support of NATO. In November 1975, Headquarters Battery, 32d AADCOM moved from Kapaun Barracks in Kaiserslautern to Cambrai-Fritsch Kaserne in Darmstadt, Germany. In 1985, the Army formulated the Air-Land Battle Doctrine to prepare for what seemed to be and inevitable clash with the Warsaw Pact forces. At that time, the 32d AADCOM Commander, MG Victor J. Hugo, stated "The end result of all these doctrinal and hardware improvements (Patriot and Hawk modifications), will be a Theater Army Air Defense Command that is leaner, prouder, more skilled and more capable to face the threat of 1990 and beyond." The 32d AADCOM's Cold War mission culminated with the fall of the Berlin Wall and the unit was inactivated on March 21, 1995 in Darmstadt, Germany. In August 1996, to meet the growing theater ballistic missile threat, the Chief of Staff of the Army directed the activation of a provisional command that became the foundation of the Army Air and Missile Defense Command and directed the AAMDC to forego the normal force development process and activate as a multi-component unit with both Regular Army and Army National Guard Soldiers. The provisional AAMDC was deployed on short notice to Southwest Asia in February 1998, in support of Operation Southern Watch/Desert Thunder.

The 32d Army Air and Missile Defense Command (AAMDC) is a one-of-a-kind theater level Army air and missile defense multi-component organization with a worldwide, 72-hour deployment mission. 32d AAMDC consists of four brigades, 11th Air Defense Artillery, 31st Air Defense Artillery, 69th Air Defense Artillery and 108th Air Defense Artillery; all stand ready to accomplish any mission - anywhere, anytime in support of the warfighting CINC. Recent contingency deployments to Southwest Asia and an intense exercise schedule in Korea exemplify the vital role and mission that the organization plays.


The 32nd Army Air Defense Com- 

mand (AADCOM) will officially inac- 

tivate on July 15, 1995. An Honors 

Ceremony held March 2 1 in Darmstadt, 

Germany, honored all of those soldiers 

who so faithfully served 32nd 

AADCOM throughout the years. 

As the final commander of 32nd 

AADCOM, I have mixed feelings as 

the inactivation process evolves. My 

pragmatic side realizes the Cold War 

has been won and that the inactivation 

of this headquarters signifies a victory 

for all Americans. However, it was 

with a great deal of emotion that we 

formally marked the inactivation of the 

unit during the Honors Ceremony. The 

primary reason the ceremony was so 

poignant was that a significant piece of 

our branch - a piece of American mili- 

tary history -was being retired. From 

meager beginnings, the unit evolved 

during the Cold War into a command 

that represented the first line of defense 

forNATO in the event ofan air attack by 

the Warsaw Pact forces, and since the 

fall of communism, evolved into a unit 

that has prepared itself for any possible 

contingency operation. It also repre- 

sented the U.S. Army's only theater- 

level air defense command. 

The 32nd AADCOM was activated 

for service in World War I, when it was 

created as the 32nd Artillery Brigade, 

Coast Artillery Corps. The command 

has come a long way from those humble 

beginnings to demonstrate its flex- 

ibility in updating both weapon sys- 

tems and tactics. The command mis- 

sion expanded to include the mission 

to defeat all types of airborne targets. 

At the same time, 32nd AADCOM 

grew from an element of NATO's "de- 


                                                                      D 2 1 ADA 32nd AADCOM                         

                                                The Seventh Army Deployment Plan


In August 1956 Seventh Army was instructed to prepare a sound, flexible operational plan for the six NIKE battalions to be received in FY 1958, based on the assumption that the tentatively selected sites would be approved. Individual plans were to be prepared for each defended area, integrating both NIKE and conventional antiaircraft artillery units.

In September 1956 Seventh Army submitted its deployment plan for the six battalions. In brief, it called for the stationing of one NIKE battalion headquarters in Worms with firing batteries located in Wackernheim, Dexheim, Worms, and Kriegsfeld. A second battalion headquarters would be in Pirmasens with the four firing batteries in the immediate vicinity. A third battalion headquarters would be at Baumholder with firing batteries in Zweibrucken, Baumholder, Kirchberg, and at the Hahn airbase. The entire fourth battalion would be in the vicinity of the Bitburg airbase. The fifth NIKE battalion would have its headquarters in Karlsruhe with firing batteries in Germersheim, Kleingartach, Grossachsenheim, and Pforzheim. The last battalion would have firing batteries in Darmstadt, Vielbrunn, Reisenbach, and Mosbach, with the battalion headquarters to be located in Mannheim

        

 

                                                      

 

 

D 2 1 ADA 32nd  AADCOM Launcher Area 

                              Charlie Section  D 2 1 ADA 32nd  AADCOM Launcher Area .  July 1978 

          

The 94th ADA Group was the home of the Nike Hercules missile battalions in West Germany during the Cold War. All 94th Group Nike missile sites have been dismantled and abandoned. The 94th Coast Artillery Group was constituted 16 December 1940. It participated in the East Indies, New Guinea and Luzon Campaigns during World War II. The 94th was decorated with the Philippine Presidential Unit Citation streamer. It was reactivated 1 April 1960 as the 94th Air Defense Group in Kaiserslautern, West Germany under the 32nd Air Defense Command. The 94th Air Defense Artillery Group was renamed to the 94th Air Defense Brigade in 1982 

After World War II, the Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 94th Antiaircraft Artillery Group, was inactivated on 15 March 1947 in the Philippine Islands.  On 01 April 1960, it was re designated in Kaiserslautern, Germany as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 94th Artillery Group, as part of the 32ndArmy Air Defense Command. The 94th Air Defense Artillery Group was re-designated on 15 March 1972 as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 94th Air Defense Artillery Group. 
The 94th Air Defense Artillery Group was later re-designated on 16 July 1983 as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 94th Air 
Defense Artillery Brigade.


During the Cold War period, the 94th Artillery Group defended NATO with Nike Hercules, HAWK, PATRIOT, Chaparral and Vulcan Air Defense Systems inspiring the motto of ?First Line of Defense.?  After the collapse of communism in Europe, the 94th Air Defense Artillery Brigade continued to support European Command contingencies throughout the European Command Area of Operations.

94th ADA Group

Kleber Ksn, Kaiserslautern [1]

2nd Bn, 1st ADA

McCully Bks, Wackernheim [1]

D 2 1 ADA

NIKE-H

5th Bn, 6th ADA

Neubrücke Hosp, Baumholder [1]

NIKE-H

2nd Bn, 56th ADA

Husterhoeh Ksn, Pirmasens [1]

NIKE-H

3rd Bn, 71st ADA

Wilkin Bks, Kornwestheim [1]

NIKE H


 

 

 

                                                             


                                    2nd Battalion, 1st Air Defense Artillery Regiment

 

The unit was reconstituted on 21 June 1950 in the Regular Army as Battery B, 1st Coast Artillery. Concurrently it was redesignated as Battery B, 1st Antiaircraft Battalion. It was redesignated on 17 March 1955 as Battery B, 1st Antiaircraft Artillery Missile Battalion and activated on 15 April 1955 at Irwin, Pennsylvania. It was redesignated on 26 October 1956 as Battery B, 74th Antiaircraft Artillery Missile Battalion.

The unit was inactivated on 1 September 1958 at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It was concurrently consolidated with Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 2nd Howitzer Battalion, 1st Artillery Regiment (active) (which had been first organized in 1901). The consolidated unit was designated as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 2nd Howitzer Battalion, 1st Artillery Regiment, an element of the 4th Infantry Division, with its organic elements constituted and activated 1 April 1957. The 2nd Howitzer Battalion, 1st Artillery Regiment was inactivated on 1 October 1963 at Fort Lewis, Washington, and relieved from assignment to the 4th Infantry Division.

The unit was redesignated on 14 July 1966 as the 2nd Battalion, 1st Artillery Regiment. It was activated on 25 August 1966 at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. It was redesignated (less former Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 2nd Howitzer Battalion, 1st Artillery Regiment) on 1 September 1971 as the 2nd Battalion, 1st Air Defense Artillery Regiment, and inactivated at Fort Sill, Oklahoma (former Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 2nd Howitzer Battalion, 1st Artillery Regiment was concurrently reorganized and redesignated as the 2nd Battalion, 1st Field Artillery Regiment, which thereafter had a separate lineage).

2nd Battalion, 1st Air Defense Artillery, was activated on 13 September 1972 in Germany. It was inactivated on 30 June 1983 in Germany. The unit was reactivated on 16 June 1987 at Fort Bliss, Texas and inactivated on 15 September 1994 at Fort Bliss, Texas. The unit was reactivated on 4 May 1996 at Fort Lewis, Washington.

  The 94th AAMDC is descended from the 94th Air Defense Artillery Brigade. It began as the 94th Artillery Group on 15 August 1969. It became the 94th Air Defense Artillery Group on 4 April 1972. On 3 June 1983, it was re-designated the 94th Air Defense Artillery Brigade. It is the 94th Army Air and Missile Defense Command since 16 October 2005.


 
 94th ADA Group (NIKE-HERCULES) Battalion Operations Center sites....
 
                                                                    (April 16 1962):

UNIT DESIGNATION

LOCATIONCOMMENTS
5th MSL Bn, 1st Arty (Nike)Wiesbaden94th Arty Gp (AD) D 2 1 ADA 32nd  AADCOM 
4th MSL Bn, 6th Arty (Nike)Spangdahlem94th Arty Gp (AD)
5th MSL Bn, 6th Arty (Nike)Baumholder94th Arty Gp (AD)
2nd MSL Bn, 56th Arty (Nike)Pirmasens94th Arty Gp (AD)
1st MSL Bn, 67th Arty (Nike)Wertheim94th Arty Gp (AD)
3rd MSL Bn, 71st Arty (Nike)Kornwestheim94th Arty Gp (AD)
 


 The 5/1 Artillery (N-H) BOC probably was collocated with the IFC closest to HHB -- A/5/1 near Wackernheim. Later named 2 1 ADA

2) The 4/6 Artillery (N-H) BOC was collocated with the D/4/6 IFC near Balesfeld (per Rolf's photos of that site). 
3) The 5/6 Artillery (N-H) BOC was collocated with the C/5/6 IFC at Baumholder (per Rolf's photos of that site). 
4) The 2/56 Artillery (N-H) BOC was collocated with Charlie's IFC on Hill 486 (now Grosser Mueckenkopf) south of Salzwoog. 
5) The 1/67 Artillery (N-H) BOC was collocated with the C/1/67 IFC near Hardheim (per Rolf's photos of the site). 
6) The 3/71 Artillery (N-H) BOC probably was collocated with the IFC closest to HHB -- A/3/71 (Kornwestheim). 

                                  1976.

 

94th ADA Group

Kleber Ksn, Kaiserslautern [1]

2nd Bn, 1st ADA

McCully Bks, Wackernheim [1]   

 D 2 1 ADA

NIKE-H

5th Bn, 6th ADA

Neubrücke Hosp, Baumholder [1]

NIKE-H

2nd Bn, 56th ADA

Husterhoeh Ksn, Pirmasens [1]

NIKE-H

3rd Bn, 71st ADA

Wilkin Bks, Kornwestheim [1]


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
  
 
 
 
 
 63rd MSL Bn -- 5th MSL Bn, 1st Arty -- 2nd Bn, 1st ADA

D 2 1 ADA 32nd  AADCOM 
Thumbnail for version as of 19:43, 7 June 2009
 
 

http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/Air_Defense_Artillery

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/army/94adabde.htm
 
 
 
 

 http://www.usarmygermany.com/Sont.htm?http&&&www.usarmygermany.com/Units/Air%20Defense/USAREUR_94th%2

 

D 2 1 ADA 32nd  AADCOM